Quick Answer: What is Jackson saying about human nature in the lottery?

With the brutal ending of her story, Jackson argues that humans are self-serving and capable of great cruelty—as long as they think their actions won’t have repercussions that harm them directly. In the town, no one speaks out against the lottery before a name is drawn.

What does The Lottery by Shirley Jackson say about human nature?

Jackson’s “The Lottery” reveals that human beings are capable of committing great atrocities and behaving cruelly, when such are condoned by society and peer pressure and tradition. The story also reveals that human beings are prone to scapegoat others.

What is Jackson’s message in The Lottery?

The primary message of Shirley Jackson’s celebrated short story “The Lottery” concerns the dangers of blindly following traditions. In the story, the entire community gathers in the town square to participate in the annual lottery.

What characteristics of human nature does Jackson’s story reveal?

Shirley Jackson examines various elements of human nature like mob mentality, superstition, the tendency to blindly following tradition, and attacking a scapegoat in her classic short story “The Lottery.” The community’s bloody annual lottery involves stoning a scapegoat to death in the town square.

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What point is the lottery making about rules?

The point is, follow the rules, because those are the rules. The point of the story as a whole to the reader though is a warning against blindly following rules. The lottery system seems stupid to the reader only because most readers would question the law in the first place.

What is the main theme of the lottery?

The main themes in “The Lottery” are the vulnerability of the individual, the importance of questioning tradition, and the relationship between civilization and violence. The vulnerability of the individual: Given the structure of the annual lottery, each individual townsperson is defenseless against the larger group.

What is the moral lesson in the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition.

Why is Tessie Hutchinson singled out as the winner of the lottery?

Tessie Hutchinson is singled out as the “winner” because she protested against the tradition of the lottery by saying “it isn’t fair.” As she protested, everyone even her own husband and three children joined in stoning her to death. … It could be considered ironic because the winner gets stoned to death.

What is the moral lesson of the lottery ticket?

The main theme of the story “The Lottery Ticket” by Anton Chekhov is that money can corrupt the soul. The prospect of a huge lottery win makes Ivan and Masha look at each other with hatred and suspicion, each one believing that the other will be negatively changed by their sudden windfall.

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How does the symbolism of the lottery represent human nature?

In “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, cruelty is part of human nature, and the participants of the lottery demonstrate human cruelty through violence towards one another; markedly, by exhibiting desensitization to violence and the acceptance of violence resulting in internal dysfunction which is perpetuated yearly.

How does the lottery relate to real life?

“The Lottery” relates to real life because it shows us how people can easily be repressed by the communities they inhabit. Most of us derive great strength and comfort from the communities in which we live. But too many people are repressed by the communities in which they live.

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